A case study of citizento- government mobile activism in Jamaica: Protesting violations of the rule of law with smart phones

Lloyd G. Waller, Cedric A.L. Taylor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

This chapter draws attention to the emergence of Mobile Activism (M-Activism) in small states. More specifically, the chapter presents the findings of a qualitative descriptive research project, which utilizes a combination of case study and discourse analysis methodologies to describe how mobile smart phones were used by a small group of activists in Jamaica to protest a violation of the Rule Of Law (ROL). The findings demonstrate that mobile smart phones can be used as an effective and efficient tool for activists to engage citizens, government agents, and government, and gain support for their cause. The findings indicate that these smart phones can be used to access and convey messages to a wide audience of ecitizens and thus have the potential for encouraging support as well as interest in a cause. The findings have wide implications with respect to: 1) how mobile technology provides opportunities to transform the relationship between governments and citizens and 2) the possible future of protests and activism in small states. The findings also have wider implications for new and emerging innovative ways of achieving good governance not only in Jamaica but also in other parts of the world.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHuman Rights and Ethics
Subtitle of host publicationConcepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications
PublisherIGI Global
Pages596-612
Number of pages17
Volume2
ISBN (Electronic)9781466664340
ISBN (Print)1466664339, 9781466664333
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 30 2014

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