A Landscape of Assimilation and Resistance: The Mount Pleasant Indian Industrial Boarding School

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Abstract

In the late nineteenth century the United States Federal government established off-reservation boarding schools that sought to accomplish an internal colonialism of American Indian communities by forcefully assimilating them into mainstream American culture. The landscape of these institutions was a primary tool to achieve their assimilationist goals. This research examines the Mount Pleasant Indian Industrial Boarding School through archival, archaeological and oral history evidence. The landscape and material record of this school also indicate that students vigorously resisted the institution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)574-588
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Historical Archaeology
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Keywords

  • Colonialism
  • Federal Indian boarding schools
  • Landscape

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