Assessing student views of traditional, free, and interactive modifications for an introductory networking course

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Common questions faced by instructors in their course designs are how to incorporate interactive technologies to increase student motivation as well as limiting the costs associated with education, contributed predominantly through course textbooks. We describe two course changes from a baseline scenario for a networking course, which aim at making the course no-cost using public domain content or, alternatively, focus on making the course highly interactive. We find that course cost benefits were offset by shortcomings in the open-source material replacing the textbook, but that the additional course costs of an interactive course are offset by increased course and learning perceptions reported by students. The focus on instructional interactivity, however, left the hands-on components up to students, with a potentially negative impact on the perceived quality of instruction.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2015 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference
Subtitle of host publicationLaunching a New Vision in Engineering Education, FIE 2015 - Proceedings
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781479984534
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2 2015
Event2015 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2015 - El Paso, United States
Duration: Oct 21 2015Oct 24 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE
Volume2015
ISSN (Print)1539-4565

Conference

Conference2015 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2015
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityEl Paso
Period10/21/1510/24/15

Keywords

  • Communication engineering education
  • Computer science education
  • student perceptions

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