Audience Perceptions of Politeness and Advocacy Skills in the 2000 and 2004 Presidential Debates

William O. Dailey, Edward A. Hinck, Shelly S. Hinck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two studies, of the 2000 and 2004 presidential debates, were conducted to determine the extent to which audience members relied on constructs of politeness or advocacy skills to evaluate candidates' messages in debates. Results from pre-debate responses as to the importance of these skills and post-debate judgments of the quality of those skills indicated that, above and beyond loyalty to a candidate, both advocacy and politeness played a role in audience members' evaluations of the candidates. While advocacy skills appeared to be more salient, politeness still played a significant role. The findings confirm the need for more descriptive, ethnographic, and scientific studies to determine how politeness and advocacy skills are related in audience assessments of candidates in debates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-210
Number of pages15
JournalArgumentation and Advocacy
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Keywords

  • advocacy
  • politeness
  • presidential campaign debates

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Audience Perceptions of Politeness and Advocacy Skills in the 2000 and 2004 Presidential Debates'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this