Awareness and usage of evidence-based learning strategies among health professions students and faculty

Felipe Piza, Jennifer Cohn Kesselheim, Juliette Perzhinsky, Joanna Drowos, Roni Gillis, Khen Moscovici, Theodora E. Danciu, Agnieszka Kosowska, Holly Gooding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Learning is essential and life-long for faculty and students. Often students and teachers use ineffective learning strategies and are not aware of evidence-based strategies. Methods: A multicenter, international, cross-sectional, online survey-based assessment of awareness of evidence-based learning strategies among health professions students (n = 679) and faculty (n = 205). Results: Students endorsed many study habits which violate evidence-based principles, including studying whatever is due soonest (389/679, 57%), failing to return to course material once a course has ended (465/679, 68%), and re-reading underlined or highlighted notes (298.679, 44%). While the majority of faculty surveyed (125/157, 80%) reported recommending effective study strategies for their students, most students (558/679, 82%) said they did not study the way they do because of instruction from faculty. The majority of faculty (142/156, 91%) and students (347/661, 53%) believe students have different learning styles. Discussion: The results of this study demonstrate health professions students continue to use many ineffective study strategies, and both students and faculty hold misconceptions about evidence-based learning. While planning a curriculum, medical educators should focus on teaching students how to learn and use higher order thinking procedures in addition to teaching content.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1411-1418
Number of pages8
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume41
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Awareness and usage of evidence-based learning strategies among health professions students and faculty'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this