Batos, Bolillos, Pochos, and Pelados: Class and Culture on the South Texas Border

Chad Richardson, Michael J Pisani

Research output: Book/ReportBookpeer-review

Abstract

A classic account of life on the Texas-Mexico border, Batos, Bolillos, Pochos, and Pelados (University of Texas Press) offers the fullest portrait currently available of the people of the South Texas/Northern Mexico borderlands. First published in 1999, the book is now extensively revised and updated throughout to cover developments since 2000, including undocumented immigration, the drug wars, race relations, growing social inequality, and the socioeconomic gap between Latinos and the rest of American society—issues of vital and continuing national importance. An outgrowth of the Borderlife Research Project conducted at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Batos, Bolillos, Pochos, and Pelados uses the voices of several hundred Valley residents, collected by embedded student researchers and backed by the findings of sociological surveys, to describe the lives of migrant farmworkers, colonia residents, undocumented domestic servants, maquiladora workers, and Mexican street children. Likewise, it explores social, racial, and ethnic relations in South Texas among groups such as Latinos, Mexican immigrants, wealthy Mexican visitors, Anglo residents or tourists, and Asian and African American residents of South Texas. With this firsthand material and an explanatory focus that utilizes and applies social-science theoretical concepts, the book thoroughly addresses the future composition and integration of Latinos into the society and culture of the United States.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherUniversity of Texas Press
Number of pages438
ISBN (Print)978-1-477-31269-8
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Batos, Bolillos, Pochos, and Pelados: Class and Culture on the South Texas Border'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this