Chronic depletion of vertebrate lipids in Aedes aegypti cells dysregulates lipid metabolism and inhibits innate immunity without altering dengue infectivity

Andrew D. Marten, Clara T. Tift, Maya O. Tree, Jesse Bakke, Michael J. Conway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of dengue virus (DENV) and other arboviruses. Previous literature suggests that vertebrate and invertebrate lipids and the nutritional status of mosquitoes modify virus infection. Here, we developed a vertebrate lipid-depleted Ae. aegypti cell line to investigate if chronic depletion of vertebrate lipids normally present in a blood meal and insect cell culture medium would impact cell growth and virus infection. Chronic depletion of vertebrate lipids reduced cell size and proliferation, although cells retained equivalent total intracellular lipids per cell by reducing lipolysis and modifying gene expression related to sugar and lipid metabolism. Downregulation of innate immunity genes was also observed. We hypothesized that chronic depletion of vertebrate lipids would impact virus infection; however, the same amount of DENV was produced per cell. This study reveals how Ae. aegypti cells adapt in the absence of vertebrate lipids, and how DENV can replicate equally well in cells that contain predominately vertebrate or invertebrate lipids.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0010890
JournalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Volume16
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2022

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