Clinicians' self-reported reactions to psychiatric emergency patients: Effect on treatment decisions

Paulette M. Gillig, James R. Hillard, James A. Deddens, John Bell, Henry E. Combs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Masters-level social work clinicians at two urban psychiatric emergency services self-rated their cognitive reactions and conscious feelings toward a total of 783 patients. Negative self-reported affect toward patients was related to their displaying overt psychotic symptoms, having a final diagnosis of substance abuse, being impulsive, unemployed, or having a history of criminal behavior. However, clinicians' reactions did not enter into the model predicting hospitalization, which included opinion of family and friends, degree of psychopathology, suicidal ideation and lack of social supports as the major predictors of whether or not a patient would be hospitalized.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-162
Number of pages8
JournalPsychiatric Quarterly
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1990

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