Cold shock and rapid cold-hardening of pharate adult flesh flies (Sarcophaga crassipalpis): Effects on behaviour and neuromuscular function following eclosion

Jonathan D. Kelty, Kathleen A. Killian, Richard E. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

63 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little is known about the nature of injury due to cold shock, or its prevention by rapid cold-hardening, in insects. To understand these phenomena better at the system level, physiological and behavioural comparisons were made between control, cold shock injured, and rapidly cold-hardened flesh flies, Sarcophaga crassipalpis Macquart (Diptera, Sarcophagidae). Cold shock impaired the proboscis extension reflex in response to 0.125, 0.5 and 1.0 M sucrose solutions. Cold shock-injured flies were unable to groom effectively and spent only 12.5% of the first 5 min following general dust application producing ineffectual leg movements. In contrast, control and rapidly cold-hardened flies exhibited normal grooming behaviour spending 92.4% and 94.1% of the first 5 min following generalized dust application grooming. Cold shock also decreased the mean resting membrane potential of tergotrochanteral muscle fibres from -65.9 mV in control flies to -41.6 mV. Conduction velocities of the three motor neurone populations innervating the tergotrochanteral muscle were all significantly lower in cold-shocked flies than in control or rapidly cold-hardened flies. Finally, cold shock impaired neuromuscular transmission as evidenced by a lack of evoked end plate potentials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-288
Number of pages6
JournalPhysiological Entomology
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1996

Keywords

  • Sarcophaga crassipalpis
  • cold shock
  • muscle
  • nervous system
  • rapid cold-hardening

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