Comparison of patient self-reports and urinalysis results obtained under naturalistic methadone treatment conditions

Stephen T. Chermack, John Roll, Mark Reilly, Leonard Davis, Usha Kilaru, John Grabowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

69 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined under naturalistic assessment conditions the validity of self-reported opiate and cocaine use among 175 veterans enrolled in methadone treatment, and factors related to self-report validity, such as stage in treatment and drug of abuse. Veterans were interviewed by clinical staff about past 30-day drug use with the addiction severity index (ASI), and urinalysis results were obtained for the same 30-day interval assessed with the ASI. Analysis revealed that urinalysis generally produced higher rates of substance use than patient self-report, and with the exception of reported opiate use among new patients presenting for treatment, validity of patient self-reported drug use generally was poor with patients under-reporting both opiate and cocaine use. The findings are in marked contrast to those obtained in other studies in which participants are ensured confidentiality regarding their self-reports. Further, the results raise questions about the utility of self-report measures of substance use to assess patient progress or methadone program performance. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-49
Number of pages7
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Concordance
  • Methadone
  • Self-report
  • Urinalysis
  • Validity

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