Concomitant use of combined hormonal contraceptives and antifibrinolytic agents for the management of heavy menstrual bleeding: A practice pattern survey

Ming Y. Lim, Lenora Olson, Madhvi A. Rajpurkar, Angela C. Weyand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Concomitant antifibrinolytic agents and combined hormonal contraceptives (CHC) have been anecdotally used to manage refractory heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). Yet, there remains uncertainty among clinicians regarding the safety of this therapeutic option as concomitant CHC is listed as a contraindication to tranexamic acid use in the United States. Aim: To describe current treatment practices and physician-reported safety and effectiveness of concomitant antifibrinolytics and CHCs. Methods: We surveyed clinician members of the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society and the Foundation of Women and Girls with Blood Disorders using a web-based survey. We also shared the survey link on Twitter. Results: Of the 224 respondents who completed the survey, 214 treated women of reproductive age with HMB. Of the 214 respondents, 138 (64%) had treated at least 1 woman with concomitant antifibrinolytic agents and CHCs in the past 12 months. Over half of these respondents (n = 77, 57%) reported that at least 50% of women had resolution of refractory HMB. One respondent reported an arterial or venous thrombotic event that occurred in 1 woman. Conclusion: We found that the use of concomitant CHCs and antifibrinolytic agent for refractory HMB is prevalent, appears to be efficacious and is relatively safe. Further research is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-100
Number of pages6
JournalThrombosis Research
Volume204
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Antifibrinolytics
  • Heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Hormonal contraceptives
  • Thrombosis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Concomitant use of combined hormonal contraceptives and antifibrinolytic agents for the management of heavy menstrual bleeding: A practice pattern survey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this