Convenience and frequency of recycling: Implications for including textiles in curbside recycling programs

Tanya Domina, Kathryn Koch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

147 Scopus citations

Abstract

This research investigated the effect of convenience on recycling frequency and variables that could be used as indicators in the prediction of recycling behavior as a basis for including textiles in curbside recycling programs. Results clearly indicated that access to curbside recycling significantly affected the amount and variety of materials recycled. Logistic regression results pointed to the variables of access, shopping behaviors, age, family size, and income as significant predictors of recycling activity, regardless of how recycling activity was defined. Despite reduced access to textile recycling opportunities, textile recycling overall was still high. The authors concluded that households with high recycling activity could be identified and targeted for extending curbside recycling programs to include textiles. To continue to reduce the amount of solid waste that is diverted to landfills, curbside recycling programs must be extended to include a greater diversity of postconsumer waste products such as textiles and apparel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)216-238
Number of pages23
JournalEnvironment and Behavior
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Convenience and frequency of recycling: Implications for including textiles in curbside recycling programs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this