Conventional audiometry, extended high-frequency audiometry, and DPOAEs in youth recreational firearm users

Shana M. Laffoon, Michael Stewart, Yunfang Zheng, Deanna K. Meinke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine if conventional audiometry, EHFA, and pDPOAEs are useful as early indicators of cochlear damage from recreational firearm impulse noise exposure in youth firearm users. Quantitative cross-sectional descriptive pilot study. Descriptive statistics and MANOVA with post hoc Tukey Honestly Significant Difference test were used to compare pDPOAEs (1–10 kHz), conventional audiometry (0.25–8 kHz), and EHFA (10–16 kHz) in YFUs. 25 YFUs (n = 11 7–12 years; n = 14 13–17 years) with self-reported poor compliance with hearing protector device wear. Conventional audiometric thresholds at 2-, 3- and 4 kHz were significantly poorer than normal but did not distinguish between older and younger YFUs or between the GBE and the contralateral ear. EHFA thresholds at 14- and 16 kHz were significantly poorer than for other frequencies, and differentiate between older and younger youths, but do not distinguish the GBE from the contralateral ear. Finally, pDPOAE levels were significantly reduced at 8- and 10 kHz but did not show any differences for the younger versus older YFUs or for the GBE from the contralateral ear. Conclusion: Both EHFA and pDPOAEs provide early evidence of NIHL in YFUs, and may be useful for the early detection of NIHL in YFUs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S40-S48
JournalInternational Journal of Audiology
Volume58
Issue numbersup1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 25 2019

Keywords

  • Otoacoustic emissions
  • extended high-frequency audiometry
  • firearm impulse noise
  • hearing conservation/hearing loss prevention

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