Copy but don't repeat: The conflict of dissimilation and reduplication in the Tawala durative

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Abstract

In this article I provide an account of the durative aspect morpheme in Tawala, an Austronesian language spoken in Papua New Guinea. Within the framework of Optimality Theory (McCarthy & Prince 1993a, Prince & Smolensky 1993), I show that the three different reduplicant shapes, previously accounted for through the use of three separate templates, actually arise from the dynamic between the drive to copy, in terms of reduplication, and the drive to dissimilate at the level of the syllable. Central to my analysis is *REPEAT (Yip 1995, 1998), a constraint prohibiting identical adjacent syllables between the reduplicant and its stem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-323
Number of pages21
JournalPhonology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

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