Directives and Dialogue: Examining the Relationship Between Participative Organizational Communication Practices and Organizational Identification Among IT Workers

Yannick C. Atouba, Elizabeth J. Carlson, John C. Lammers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explores how the dialogue—or lack thereof—between employees’ opinions and organization-wide communications relates to employees’ identification with the organization. Using survey data from a sample of 111 IT workers, we performed cross-level tests to explore how employee voice, the perceived adequacy of organization-wide downward communication, and job satisfaction related to employees’ organizational identification. The results of the hierarchical regression and mediation analyses revealed that higher levels of employee voice were associated with higher levels of organizational identification and fully mediated by job satisfaction. Similarly, higher levels of organization-wide communication adequacy were associated with higher levels of organizational identification and partially mediated by job satisfaction. The findings suggest that inclusive and participative organizational communication practices are most likely to foster organizational identification when they are viewed favorably by employees and positively impact their job experiences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)530-559
Number of pages30
JournalInternational Journal of Business Communication
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Keywords

  • Employee work participation
  • communication
  • job satisfaction
  • mediation
  • organizational identification

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