Effects of explicit timing on mathematics problem completion rates in African-American third-grade elementary students

Katrina N. Rhymer, Christopher H. Skinner, Carlen Henington, Robyn A. D'Reaux, San Pier Sims

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

A multiple baseline design was used to evaluate the effects of Van Houten and Thompson's (1976) explicit timing procedure on problem completion rates and accuracy levels in African-American third-grade students. During the explicit timing phase, students were told that they were being timed and were instructed to circle the last problem completed at each 1-min interval. Results showed that the explicit timing procedure increased problem completion rates. A decreasing trend in percentage of problems correct also occurred. Exploratory data analysis suggested that decreases in accuracy were not caused by the explicit timing procedure and did not occur in students who had attained high levels of preintervention accuracy. Discussion focuses on recommendations for educators who wish to use timing procedures to increase students' rates of accurate responding.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)673-677
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Applied Behavior Analysis
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Keywords

  • African-American students
  • Rates of responding
  • Timing

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