Effects of Heavy Squat Training on a Vibration Platform on Maximal Strength and Jump Performance in Resistance-Trained Men.

J T Linton, Roger L Hammer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to determine maximal strength and jump performance outcomes of heavy squat training on a low-amplitude (,1.0 mm peak-to-peak) vibration platform (VP). Nineteen recreationally resistance-trained college-aged men (22.3 ± 1.66 years) completed the 6-week study. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 training groups: SQT (n = 10) performed conventional back squats on the floor and SQTV (n = 9) performed back squats on the VP. Supervised training took place over 12 sessions (2 d·wk -1 ), which used an aggressive strength development protocol (85-95% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]), which was identically followed by both groups. After the intervention, both groups showed (via t-test) a marked increase (p, 0.001) in 1RM squat strength (SQT = 34.5 kg vs. SQTV = 36.2 kg), but there was no significant difference (via mixed analysis of variance) between groups (p = 0.875). Standing broad jump performance increased by an average of 5-6 cm, but was not significantly changed in either group (SQT; p = 0.199, SQTV; p = 0.087). In conclusion, squats performed with whole body vibration (WBV) were not superior to conventional squats with respect to maximal strength and jump performance outcomes. It seems that there was no additive effect of superimposed WBV training on strength beyond that caused by strength training alone. This study can help strength conditioning professionals and athletes make an informed decision on whether to invest in a VP and use WBV as an alternative or a complementary mode of training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1809-1815
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume32
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

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