Exosomes derived from human macrophages suppress endothelial cell migration by controlling integrin trafficking

Hee Doo Lee, Yeon Hyang Kim, Doo Sik Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

76 Scopus citations

Abstract

Integrin trafficking, including internalization, recycling, and lysosomal degradation, is crucial for the regulation of cellular functions. Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles, are believed to play important roles in intercellular communications. This study demonstrates that exosomes released from human macrophages negatively regulate endothelial cell migration through control of integrin trafficking. Macrophage-derived exosomes promote internalization of integrin β1 in primary HUVECs. The internalized integrin β1 persistently accumulates in the perinuclear region and is not recycled back to the plasma membrane. Experimental results indicate that macrophage-derived exosomes stimulate trafficking of internalized integrin β1 to lysosomal compartments with a corresponding decrease in the integrin destined for recycling endosomes, resulting in proteolytic degradation of the integrin. Moreover, ubiquitination of HUVEC integrin β1 is enhanced by the exosomes, and exosome-mediated integrin degradation is blocked by bafilomycin A, a lysosomal degradation inhibitor. Macrophage-derived exosomes were also shown to effectively suppress collagen-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway and HUVEC migration, which are both dependent on integrin β1. These observations provide new insight into the functional significance of exosomes in the regulation of integrin trafficking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1156-1169
Number of pages14
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Endothelial cell migration
  • Exosomes
  • Integrin trafficking
  • Macrophages

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