Group Differences in Work Sample Ratings of Manufacturing Applicants: Exploring Group Gender Composition Biases

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Gender bias in hiring is controversial. Explanations for this include more lenient ratings given by females, higher ratings for males due to traditional gender stereotypes, and selecting applicants based on a fit between their gender and the supposed ‘maleness’ or ‘femaleness’ of the job. The current research demonstrated that male dominated rater groups of manufacturing managers rate both male and female assembler applicants higher than female dominated rater groups. Female-dominated manager groups rate male applicants significantly higher than female applicants, though not as high as male-dominated manager groups. Both male and female managers, assembled in selection groups for assessing work samples, show a tendency to buy into the traditional male gender stereotypes that are prevalent in manufacturing. The presence of differences between gender-dominated groups raises concern for potential gender bias and increases the risk of adverse impact.
Original languageEnglish
JournalLeadership & Organizational Management Journal
Volume4
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 15 2012

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