How do Adolescents Learn Cyber-victimization Coping Skills? An Examination of Parent and Peer Coping Socialization

Stacey L. Bradbury, Eric F. Dubow, Sarah E. Domoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recently, cyber-victimization has become an ever increasing concern for adolescents. Given the negative consequences of cyber-victimization, it is important to understand how adolescents learn strategies to cope (i.e., “coping socialization”) with cyber-victimization. The purpose of this study is to understand common coping strategies reported by adolescents, identify from whom youth learn cyber-victimization coping strategies (coaching), and explore how coaching is associated with adolescents’ self-reported use of coping. In a sample of 329 adolescents (49% male; 70% white), we found that positive coping strategies (e.g., problem solving, seeking social support) are used most frequently, and adolescents’ perceptions of both parent and peer coping socialization is associated with self-reported use of coping. Interventionists can use this information to adapt interventions to include influential positive socializers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1866-1879
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume47
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Coping
  • Cyber-victimization
  • Socialization

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