"Impact of exposure to electronic cigarette marketing among youth: A systematic review."

Anastasia Bjork, Margaret L Danowski, Shayesteh Jahanfar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Abstract<br> <br>Background: Exposure to electronic cigarette marketing, compared to no exposure, impacts the perceived harm of occasional e-cigarette use among youth.<br> <br>Methods: We searched PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Central, Web of Science, and grey literature. Two independent reviewers screened the papers and extracted the data. Quality of studies was assessed using the Cochrane risk-of-bias assessment tool. The outcome of interest was on perceived harm of occasional e-cigarette use among youth. For this continuous outcome, the mean difference with 95% confidence interval was measured.<br> <br>Results: Three randomized controlled trials (n=1789) studying adolescents were included in the review. Using a meta-analysis, it was found that the glamorous advertisement effect on e-cigarette appeal among youth was 8% less than that of the control group (-0.07, 95%CI -0.16, 0.02, moderate quality of evidence, I2=0%), although this effect measure was not significant.<br> <br>Conclusions: This review adds to existing evidence that electronic cigarette advertisements are not effective in e-cigarette appeal among youth. In order to thoroughly assess the effects of e-cigarette marketing, more experimental studies need to be performed regarding the likeliness to use vapes/cigarettes.<br> <br><b>Keywords</b>: e-cigarette, youth, systematic review
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Public Health
StateSubmitted - 1800

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