Information‐driven versus story‐driven: What children remember when they are read informational stories

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Abstract

This study examined the responses of second‐grade students asked to listen to pseudonarration for different purposes. Eighty‐one students were divided into two groups who heard the text, Dear Mr. Blueberry. One group listened for information concerning whales. The second group listened to the text as a story. Immediate recalls were analyzed both quantitatively (analyzing idea units) and qualitatively. Delayed recalls were analyzed only quantitatively. The immediate and delayed recall results showed that regardless of purpose given, the students focused on the story idea units more than the informational idea units. In addition, those students given the story purpose exhibited a greater connection with the story experience as opposed to those students given the information purpose, who adhered more to an objective appraisal of the text. Implications of these findings for research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-130
Number of pages22
JournalReading Psychology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

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