Introduction: (Re)discovery of the strange and the familiar: Theory and methods for a twenty-first-century biological anthropology

Sang Hee Lee, Cathy Willermet

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingForeword/postscript

Abstract

In this unfortunate era of anti-intellectualism and fake news, it is essential that biological anthropologists engage with each other, the academy, the media, and the public about the nature of humans, how we got here, and how (and why) we vary. One of the strengths of anthropology is that we can be self-reflective. We can re-examine our questions, our theory, our methods, our data, and deal skeptically with all of them. What is a species? How do we identify groups? How do we recognize agency, or identity, or frailty, in the past? The colonial history of western science affects our interpretation of evidence (Roy 2018); now formerly colonized peoples have opportunities to produce knowledge of their own histories, so they can shift the narrative, making what was once a familiar story, strange (Rottenburg 2009; Véran 2012).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEvaluating Evidence in Biological Anthropology
Subtitle of host publicationThe Strange and the Familiar
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages1-8
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781108569125
ISBN (Print)9781108476843
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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