Knowledge and attitudes toward breast-feeding: Differences among dietitians, nurses, and physicians working with WIC clients

Jane E. Bagwell, Olivia W. Kendrick, Kathleen R. Stitt, James D. Leeper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

We assessed the knowledge of and attitude toward breast-feeding of dietitians, nurses, and physicians who work with individuals in the Alabama Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children. On a scale of 0 to 100, dietitians expressed stronger interest in lactation (78.6) and exhibited greater knowledge (79.6) of the questions asked than nurses (74.5 and 73.0, respectively). Attitude and knowledge scores of physicians (70.2 and 75.5, respectively) were not statistically different from those of dietitians or nurses. Respondents disagreed greatly about the relationship of breast-feeding to weight loss and the appropriateness of oral contraceptive during breast-feeding 6 weeks postpartum. Professionals were more knowledgeable about benefits to infants than about maternal concerns. Results of this study suggest that professional breast-feeding education programs should address maternal concerns such as weight loss, contraception, and mastitis as well as benefits to the infant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)801-806
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume93
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1993

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