Leisure Activity, Leisure Satisfaction, and Hedonic and Eudaimonic Well-Being Among Older Adults With Cancer Experience

Sanghee Chun, Kyung Hee Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Older adults with cancer experience are more likely to encounter a notable reduction of participation in physical and social leisure activities, which may threaten their overall well-being. The purpose of this study was to explore how specific types of leisure activities and leisure satisfaction were linked to hedonic and eudaimonic well-being among older adults who had experienced cancer. A nationally representative sample of 2,934 older adults with lifetime cancer experience was retained from the Health and Retirement Study. The results of regression analysis revealed that walking for 20 minutes was reported as the only type of leisure activity related to hedonic well-being for the oldest-old (85+ years old). The current study also found that TV watching was significantly, but negatively associated with eudaimonic well-being for the young-old (50-74 years of age). In contrast, using a computer was positively linked to hedonic and eudaimonic well-being among the young-old and old-old (75-84 years of age). The current study made a significant contribution to build the body of knowledge that the different age groups of older adults who had experienced cancer can enhance eudaimonic and hedonic well-being by participating in different types of leisure activities. Implications for further research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychological Reports
StatePublished - Aug 28 2022

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