“ Migrant Selectivity or Cultural Buffering? Investigating the Black Immigrant Health Advantage”

Dilshani Sarathchandra, Cedric Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prior studies on population health have reported an “immigrant health advantage” in which immigrants tend to show better health outcomes compared to their native-born racial/ethnic counterparts. Migrant selectivity and cultural buffering have been proposed as explanations for this relative advantage, predominantly in studies that focus on Latino immigrants’ health in the US. This study adds to the relatively scant literature on black immigrant health advantage by comparing the two hypotheses (migrant selectivity and cultural buffering) as related to black immigrant health. The effect of nativity on infant low birth weight is tested using data from the US. Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Results indicate that immigrant black mothers do have relatively better health outcomes that may result from cultural buffering, which reduces their risky health behaviors.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)390-396
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume18
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 2016

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