Movement breaks for classroom and online learning: An outreach project connecting university and elementary school students

Elaine Difalco Daugherty, Heather Trommer-Beardslee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

After witnessing their own children learn online during the 2020 COVID-19 global pandemic, Heather Trommer-Beardslee and Elaine DiFalco Daugherty collaborated with their university students to create instructional movement videos designed for elementary teachers to use as movement breaks during the school day. Knowing that movement triggers the human brain to reinvigorate focused learning, the video sequences were developed as a tool to aid teachers in providing opportunities to break up long periods of sitting and engage students in active dance play to stimulate multiple senses and therefore increase brain activity. Trommer-Beardslee worked with university students to create movement content while Daugherty worked with them on breath and speech to ensure that the verbal teaching component was articulate and accessible. This article details the inspiration, goals and process used for collaborative, practical engagement and provides a template for replication and further development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-105
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Arts and Health
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2022

Keywords

  • brain cognition
  • children
  • collaboration
  • dance
  • education during COVID-19 pandemic
  • online learning
  • outreach

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