Pediatric Practitioners’ Screening for Adverse Childhood Experiences: Current Practices and Future Directions

Tierney K. Popp, Cheryl Geisthardt, Elizabeth A. Bumpus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This pilot study surveyed pediatric medical practitioners on their screening of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). The study focused on perspectives related to engagement in screening and barriers to screening. Practitioners were pediatric and family physicians and physician assistants (N = 48). Results suggest that although practitioners believed it was their role to screen, less than half did so. They were more likely to screen if they were familiar with the research on ACEs, or had received training on ACEs screening. Perceived barriers included lack of professional education on the topic, not enough time to screen, and lack of appropriate screening tools. Other issues such as which ACEs were most likely to be screened for and follow-up practices after positive screening also were explored. Further work is needed to understand screening and treatment practices, and policy changes should be explored in an attempt to increase practitioner involvement in ACEs screening.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Work in Public Health
Volume35
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2020

Keywords

  • Adverse childhood experiences
  • child health
  • pediatric primary care
  • pediatric screening
  • screening barriers
  • social determinants of health
  • toxic stress

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