Reparations and Reconciliation in the Aftermath of Civil War

Prakash Adhikari, Wendy L. Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Both international legal principles and much of the literature on transitional justice support the provision of reparations as a necessary component of justice in postconflict societies. According to the UN Basic Principles and Guidelines (United Nations 2005: para. IX), "adequate, effective and prompt reparation is intended to promote justice by redressing gross violations of international human rights law or serious violations of international humanitarian law." However, few scholarly studies have looked systematically at victims' views of the importance of various forms of reparations in providing justice. Using individual-level data collected in the aftermath of the civil war in Nepal, we investigate people's perceptions of the importance of various forms of reparations that appear in the UN Basic Principles and Guidelines and that have been offered in transitional justice processes. The findings suggest that compensation for losses, along with punishment of perpetrators, are viewed as being more important to providing justice for individuals than other forms of reparations, regardless of the type of grievance(s) suffered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-446
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Human Rights
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013

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