Safety and immunogenicity of acellular pertussis vaccine combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids in 17− to 24–month–old children

M. Glode, L. Joffe, K. Reisinger, M. Blatter, S. Plotkin, B. Watson, L. Grossman, B. Asmar, M. Berry, S. Starobin, G. Fisch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

A double–blind, randomized, controlled trial comparing 4 lots of acellular pertussis–diphtheria tetanus toxoids vaccine (APDT) to whole cell DTP vaccine in 397 children was conducted at 7 clinical centers. Children were immunized at 17 to 24 months of age and sera were obtained pre– and postimmunization. Sera were analyzed for antibody to pertussis antigens (pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, with a molecular weight of 69 000 (69k) outer membrane protein and agglutinogens) and to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. Information concerning local reactions and systemic events was collected daily for 10 days postimmunization. The acellular vaccine produced significantly fewer local reactions than whole cell DTP. Parents reported that drowsiness or fretfulness occurred significantly less often in APDT vaccine recipients compared with whole cell DTP recipients. Fever ≥38.3°C ocurred in 8% of APDT vaccine recipients and in 15% of whole cell DTP vaccine recipients (P = 0.06). The only significant difference in immune response to pertussis antigens between the two vaccines was for filamentous hemagglutinin (P < 0.01) for which significantly higher antibody concentrations were found in the APDT vaccine group. We conclude that this APDT vaccine is safe and immunogenic when administered as a booster dose to 18–month–old children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)530-535
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1992

Keywords

  • Acellular pertussis vaccine

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