Sandbagging in competition: Responding to the pressure of being the favorite

Bryan Gibson, Daniel Sachau, Bruce Doll, Roberta Shumate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous research suggests that high sandbaggers are more likely to sandbag when performance pressure is high. The current research proposed that (a) being favored in competition increases performance pressure and (b) high sandbaggers will be more likely to sandbag when favored in competition. Experiment 1 demonstrated that favored competitors are perceived as being under more pressure and that high sandbaggers believe that this pressure is related to choking. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that when favored in competition, high sandbaggers are more likely to sandbag. Results suggest that being favored in competition leads to additional performance pressure and that high sandbaggers respond to this pressure by sandbagging. Data also further demonstrate the distinction between sandbagging and self-handicapping.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1119-1130
Number of pages12
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2002

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