Support for affirmative action, justice perceptions, and work attitudes: A study of gender and racial-ethnic group differences

Christopher P. Parker, Boris B. Baltes, Neil D. Christiansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

141 Scopus citations

Abstract

Do gender and race-ethnicity moderate people's reactions to perceptions that their organization supports affirmative action/equal opportunity (AA/EO)? This study compared relationships between perceptions of support for AA/EO, distributive and procedural justice, career development opportunities, and work attitudes in 4 groups of federal employees: White men (n = 4,919), White women (n = 1,622), Blacks/Hispanics (n = 492), and Asians (n = 195). Surprisingly, White men did not associate support for AA/EO with a loss in career development opportunities, organizational injustice, or negative work attitudes. For women and racial-ethnic minorities, support for AA/EO was positively linked to perceptions of organizational justice and increased career development opportunities. As predicted, Blacks/Hispanics had more positive reactions than other employee groups. We conclude that support for AA/EO is generally viewed as fair and has positive attitudinal consequences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)376-389
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume82
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1997

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