The Association between Night Eating Syndrome and Weight Status, Sleep Patterns, and Lifestyle Choices among a Sample of College Students.

Najat Yahia, Najat Yehia

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

Abstract

Background Lack of sleep may contribute to evening hyperphagia and, eventually, weight gain. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of night eating syndrome (NES) and its association with weight status and sleep patterns among a sample of college students. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a sample of 413 undergraduate students, mean age of 20.6 ± 1.67 years, in spring 2016 at Central Michigan University. Students who agreed to participate signed a consent form and completed an online survey including the Night Eating Diagnostic and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Questionnaires. Students also provided demographic information, and their anthropometric measurements were taken. Participants were grouped by severity of NES features as follows: normal, mild night eater, moderate night eater, and full night eater syndrome. Separate ANOVA models were used to test the association between NES category and BMI and sleep duration. Results Results showed that 88% of students were not night eaters and only 1.2% met the criteria for the full syndrome category. There was no significant relationship between NES Category and BMI or gender. However, NES was associated with sleep duration (P = 0.03). Students with full NES reported shorter sleep time (5.9±0.5 hrs) compared to the other groups (7.3±0.1 hrs). Conclusion Although the prevalence of NES was low in our sample, NES was only apparent in those students with shorter sleep time than in the other groups. However, it remains unclear whether evening hyperphagia is a response to a lack of sleep or vice versa, and further research is needed.
Original languageEnglish
StatePublished - Nov 4 2016
EventObesity Society 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting - New Orleans, LA
Duration: Nov 4 2016Nov 4 2016

Conference

ConferenceObesity Society 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting
Period11/4/1611/4/16

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