The benefits of multimodal information: A meta-analysis comparing visual and visual-tactile feedback

Matthew S. Prewett, Liuquin Yang, Frederick R.B. Stilson, Ashley A. Gray, Michael D. Coovert, Jennifer Burke, Elizabeth Redden, Linda R. Elliot

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Information display systems have become increasingly complex and more difficult for human cognition to process effectively. Based upon Wicken's Multiple Resource Theory (MRT), information delivered using multiple modalities (i.e., visual and tactile) could be more effective than communicating the same information through a single modality. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare user effectiveness when using visual-tactile task feedback (a multimodality) to using only visual task feedback (a single modality). Results indicate that using visual-tactile feedback enhances task effectiveness more so than visual feedback (g = .38). When assessing different criteria, visual-tactile feedback is particularly effective at reducing reaction time (g = .631) and increasing performance (g = .618). Follow up moderator analyses indicate that visual-tactile feedback is more effective when workload is high (g = .844) and multiple tasks are being performed (g = .767). Implications of results are discussed in the paper.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationICMI'06
Subtitle of host publication8th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces, Conference Proceedings
Pages333-338
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
EventICMI'06: 8th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - Banff, AB, Canada
Duration: Nov 2 2006Nov 4 2006

Publication series

NameICMI'06: 8th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces, Conference Proceeding

Conference

ConferenceICMI'06: 8th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces
Country/TerritoryCanada
CityBanff, AB
Period11/2/0611/4/06

Keywords

  • Meta-analysis
  • Multimodal
  • Visual feedback
  • Visual-tactile feedback

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