The Conundrum of Obesity and Gastroparesis Hospitalizations: A Retrospective Comparative Analysis of Hospitalization Characteristics and Disparities Amongst Socioeconomic and Racial Backgrounds in the United States

Dushyant S. Dahiya, Sumant Inamdar, Abhilash Perisetti, Hemant Goyal, Amandeep Singh, Rajat Garg, Chin I. Cheng, Asim Kichloo, Mohammad Al-Haddad, Neil Sharma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Aims We aim to assess the influence of obesity on gastroparesis (GP) hospitalizations in the United States (US). Methods The National Inpatient Sample was analyzed from 2007-2017 to identify all adult hospitalizations with a primary discharge diagnosis of GP. They were subdivided based on the presence or absence of obesity (body mass index > 30). Hospitalization characteristics, procedural differences, all-cause inpatient mortality, mean length of stay (LOS), and mean total hospital charge (THC) were identified and compared. Results From 2007-2017, there were 140 293 obese GP hospitalizations accounting for 13.75% of all GP hospitalizations in the US. Obese GP hospitalizations were predominantly female (76.11% vs 64.36%, P < 0.001) and slightly older (51.9 years vs 50.8 years, P < 0.001) compared to the non-obese cohort. Racial disparities were noted as Blacks (25.49% vs 22%, P < 0.001) had higher proportions of GP hospitalizations with obesity compared to the non-obese cohort. Furthermore, we noted higher rates of inpatient upper endoscopy utilization (6.05% vs 5.42%, P < 0.001), longer mean LOS (5.71 days vs 5.32 days, P < 0.001), and higher mean THC ($53 373 vs $45 040, P < 0.001) for obese GP hospitalizations compared to the non-obese group. However, obese GP hospitalizations had lower rates of inpatient mortality (0.92% vs 1.33%, P < 0.001), and need for nutritional support with endoscopic jejunostomy (0.25 vs 0.56%, P < 0.001) and total parenteral nutrition (1.46% vs 2.33%, P < 0.001) compared to the non-obese cohort. Conclusions In the US, compared to non-obese, a higher proportion of obese GP hospitalizations were female and Blacks. Obese GP hospitalizations also had higher THC, LOS, and rates of upper endoscopy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)655-663
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2022

Keywords

  • Cost
  • Gastroparesis
  • Mortality
  • Obesity
  • Outcomes

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