The Effect of Acute Glutamine Supplementation on Markers of Inflammation and Fatigue During Consecutive Days of Simulated Wildland Firefighting

Roberto C. Nava, Micah N. Zuhl, Terence A. Moriarty, Fabiano T. Amorim, Kelsey C. Bourbeau, Anna M. Welch, James J. Mccormick, Kelli E. King, Christine M. Mermier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective:To examine the effect of oral glutamine supplementation on inflammation and fatigue during and after simulated wildland firefighting (WLFF) tasks in hot conditions over 2 consecutive days.Methods:Eleven men and women ingested a glutamine supplement or a placebo before and after simulated wildland firefighting in an environmental chamber (38°C, 35% relative humidity). Subjective fatigue, markers of inflammation, and cellular stress were measured pre, post and 4hours post-exercise on both days.Results:Gastrointestinal damage, subjective fatigue, and ratings of perceived exertion were lower after glutamine supplementation compared with placebo. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and nuclear factor kappa-inhibitor alpha (IκBα) levels were higher on both days of the glutamine trial compared with placebo.Conclusions:Glutamine supplementation may improve recovery after fire suppression in WLFFs. This may result from the upregulation of HSP70 which inhibits inflammation and protects against gastrointestinal (GI) barrier damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E33-E42
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Keywords

  • gastrointestinal permeability
  • heat shock protein 70
  • heat stress
  • inhibitor
  • intestinal fatty acid binding protein
  • nuclear factor kappa-inhibitor alpha

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