The politics of beer: analysis of the congressional votes on the beer bill of 1933

Eline Poelmans, John A. Dove, Jason E. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nine days after he took office in March 1933, Franklin Roosevelt asked Congress to amend existing federal Prohibition policy so as to allow for the sale and consumption of 3.2% alcohol beer. Over the following 8 days, the so-called “beer bill” was proposed, debated, passed and signed into law. This study analyzes the political decision making behind one of FDR’s earliest New Deal policies. Specifically, we consider how voter preferences, representatives’ ideologies, national party affiliations, and the influence of special interests affected legislative decision making. We find that special interests and party affiliations were particularly important drivers of congressional voting behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-106
Number of pages26
JournalPublic Choice
Volume174
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Beer legalization
  • Franklin Roosevelt
  • Median voter
  • New Deal
  • Prohibition
  • Representative ideology
  • Special interests

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