The relationship between temperament and anxiety: Phase i in the development of a risk screening model to predict stress-related health problems

Andrea D. Clements, Beth A. Bailey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study of 509 (340 female) undergraduate university students in southern Appalachia who completed the Adult Temperament Questionnaire (ATQ) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), is the first phase in the development of a model to predict risk for stress-related health problems. Results indicate that high negative affect strongly predicted individuals with above average anxiety (OR = 3.7, 95% CI 2.43, 5.64), while high positive affect, effortful control, and sociability predicted that individuals would be low in reported anxiety (OR =.33 [95% CI.25,.44],.29 [95% CI.19,.45], and.69 [95% CI.56,.86], respectively).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-525
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Keywords

  • Health care
  • Health promotion
  • Psychological distress
  • Stress
  • Temperament

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