Timely empiric antimicrobials are associated with faster microbiologic clearance in preterm neonates with late-onset bloodstream infections

Girija Natarajan, Lea Monday, Terri Scheer, Mirjana Lulic-Botica

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: The impact of timely empiric antimicrobial therapy on neonates is unclear. Our aim was to examine rates of effective timely empiric antimicrobial therapy on preterm neonates, together with the associated outcomes. Methods: We performed a single-centre retrospective study of preterm infants (<32 weeks of gestational age) with a late-onset (>72 h of age) bloodstream infection (BSI). Empiric antimicrobial administration took place before the results of blood culture were available and its timing was determined by the electronic medical records. Results: Our cohort (n = 105) was predominantly female (59%) and black (83%) with a mean (SD) gestational age of 27.4 (2.3) weeks and birthweight of 948 (335) g. Effective empiric antimicrobials were initiated in 114 (69%) of 165 BSI episodes, and a third of the BSIs without empiric antimicrobials were found to be fungal. Both antimicrobial timing (r = 0.27, p = 0.002) and fungal organism (r = 0.35, p = 0.0001) showed significant correlations and were independently associated with time to clearance. Neither variable was associated with survival or length of stay. Conclusion: Two-thirds of preterm infants with late-onset BSIs received effective empiric antimicrobials. Timely empiric antimicrobials were associated with shorter time to microbiologic clearance. These data suggest the need for standardised guidelines and quality improvement initiatives.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e418-e423
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume103
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

Keywords

  • Antimicrobials
  • Bloodstream infection
  • Neonates
  • Preterm

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