Toys and toy accessories strike back pediatric injuries from plush toys, toy figurines, and doll and toy accessories

Carolina Vega, Nirupama Kannikeswaran, Ahmad Farooqi, Rajan Arora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The aim of the study was to examine age-associated injury trends and severe injury proportions for plush toys, toy figurines, and doll and toy accessories. We hypothesized that the proportion of severe injuries would be highest in the younger than 3-year and 3- to 5-year age groups. Methods: We analyzed injury patterns from plush toys, toy figurines, and doll and toy accessories for ages of 0 to 18 years from 2010 to 2018 using the Consumer Product Safety Commission National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. Exclusion criteria included unspecified toy categories, adult or pet involvement, or unspecified disposition. National estimates were calculated with National Electronic Injury Surveillance System sample weights. Outcome of interest was severe injury proportions per age and toy category. Severe injury was defined as life- or limb-threatening injuries or injuries requiring admission. χ2 test was used to analyze the distribution of categorical variables. Results: We analyzed 1360 injuries. The majority occurred in female (n = 771, 56.7%) and ages of 3 to 5 years (n = 580, 42.7%). Annual injury frequency remained stable. One fifth of injuries were severe (n = 321, 23.6%), with a national estimate of 9304.7. The majority of both total (n = 778, 57.2%) and severe injuries (n = 182, 56.7%) resulted from toy figurines. Life-threatening injury secondary to foreign body aspiration or ingestion with a risk for asphyxiation was the most common severe injury. Severe injuries were significantly more common in the younger than 3-year group (odds ratio, 3.59; 95% confidence interval, 2.40–5.36) and 3- to 5-year age group (odds ratio, 2.97; 95% confidence interval, 2.01–4.39) than the older than 5-year age group. Conclusions: Injury frequency remained stable. The greatest proportion of injuries were in ages up to 5 years, with most injuries occurring in the 3-to 5-year age category, and a significant proportion of injuries were severe.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E714-E718
JournalPediatric Emergency Care
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aspiration
  • Ingestion
  • Injury prevention
  • Severe injury
  • Small parts
  • Toys

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Toys and toy accessories strike back pediatric injuries from plush toys, toy figurines, and doll and toy accessories'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this