Virtual reality game-based therapy for treatment of postural and co-ordination abnormalities secondary to TBI: A pilot study

K. I. Ustinova, J. Perkins, W. A. Leonard, C. J. Hausbeck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Primary objective: The study objective was to test the efficacy of game-based virtual reality (VR) therapy as a mean of correcting postural and co-ordination abnormalities in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Therapy was done with interactive customized VR games and scenarios, utilizing an Xbox Kinect sensor. Research design: The study was a pilot project using the structure of a phase II clinical trial. Methods and procedures: Fifteen participants with mild-To-moderate chronic TBI-related balance and motor co-ordination impairments participated in 15 sessions, each lasting ∼50-55 minutes, scheduled 2-3 times a week over 5-6 consecutive weeks. Participants were evaluated at baseline, immediately after the final session and in a 1-month follow-up with a battery of clinical tests (measuring postural stability, gait and co-ordination) and movement performance parameters. Movement parameters included arm-leg co-ordination, dynamic stability and arm precision, calculated from kinematic data recorded with Xbox Kinect sensor. Results: Following therapy, most participants improved their static and dynamic postural stability, gait and arm movements. These effects persisted over the retention interval. Conclusions: Results will be used to improve the VR program, with the goal of producing a cost-effective, accessible and easy to individualize therapeutic approach. The pilot data will be used for designing a larger scale clinical trial.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)486-495
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Injury
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Brain injury
  • Clinical trial
  • Motor recovery
  • Postural control
  • Rehabilitation
  • Virtual reality

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