Visualizing the Inner Architecture of Poly(ε-caprolactone)-Based Biomaterials and Its Impact on Performance Optimization

Adam J.P. Bauer, Yitian Wu, Jianzhao Liu, Bingbing Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The performance of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-based biomaterials is defined by spatial distributions of PCL's amorphous and crystalline domains. Unfortunately, directly visualizing their inner architectures has been challenging. This study demonstrates, the superior degradation selectivity of Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) enzyme; when used at low concentrations, it preferentially breaks down the amorphous chains prior to the crystalline chains. Top-down dissection using this enzyme is performed on several PCL-based systems. Self-assembled nanolamellae (e.g., thin films) or hierarchically nanostructured crystalline skeletons (e.g., fibers) are clearly captured. Thus, the spatial distribution of the amorphous compartments can be precisely mapped out, which otherwise cannot be achieved. The superior degradation selectivity of Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) enzyme is demonstrated. When used at low concentrations, it preferentially breaks down the amorphous chains of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) prior to its crystalline chains. Top-down dissection using this enzyme is performed on several PCL-based model systems. The spatial distribution of the amorphous compartments are precisely mapped out, which otherwise cannot be achieved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1554-1562
Number of pages9
JournalMacromolecular Bioscience
Volume15
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Keywords

  • electrospinning
  • morphology
  • poly(ε-caprolactone)
  • secondary nanostructures

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