When Surgeons Are “Too Old” to Practice Surgery: Recommendations to Balance the Imperatives of Public Safety and Practical Necessity

Mark A Cwiek, Dan Vick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Few countries have legally set a maximum age for practicing surgery. This is difficult to sustain as surgeon shortages in many localities require hospitals to grant surgical privileges based on internal peer review systems. This approach is not without problems. Some hospitals and medical societies have developed competency assessment programs. Based on the literature and the experience of various jurisdictions, the authors recommend a policy approach that does not mandate a retirement age for surgeons, but rather a mandatory age of 65 at which surgeons shall be legally subject to periodic assessment of physical dexterity, eye/hand coordination, and cognitive skills.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8 pages
JournalHospital Topics
Volumehttps://doi.org/10.1080/00185868.2021.1977205
StatePublished - Sep 14 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'When Surgeons Are “Too Old” to Practice Surgery: Recommendations to Balance the Imperatives of Public Safety and Practical Necessity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this